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41
General Discussion / Re: Happy New Year
« Last post by Edward Bear on January 01, 2020 »
Gracias, Iguelmente mi amigo.
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General Discussion / Happy New Year
« Last post by TimO on December 31, 2019 »
Feliz Ano Nuevo to all the contributors to this page. Seven weeks and counting until we're over in February. Looking forward to our annual dose of winter sun and swimming in the volcanic  sea pools behind the resort hotel just outside of Alcala.
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General Discussion / Re: Does anyone recognise this fish?
« Last post by White Rose on December 27, 2019 »
Thank you so much Dolly. Sorry for late reply but now back in UK.  It was our last walk to the harbour that the Angel Shark was spotted. From what you've  said i feel privileged  to have seen one and even more lucky to  have captured it on camera. Albeit  a not very  good one.
Thanks for the  video clip.  They are wonderful creatures.
Wishing I was still in L G. Just a touch cooler here. No tshirts and shorts for a while. Thanks again.
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General Discussion / Re: Does anyone recognise this fish?
« Last post by Edward Bear on December 27, 2019 »
Wonderful Dolly. Thank you for the information. Very interesting. Many years ago we saw a turtle in the marina.
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General Discussion / Re: Does anyone recognise this fish?
« Last post by Dolly Diver on December 27, 2019 »

Definately an Angel shark and you were very lucky to see one.


While diving in Tenerife from November to March there is a chance of seeing an angel sharks (sometimes called Monk fish) Squatina squatina.  So far this winter we have seen 6 whilst diving.  Click on this link to see the short video of one on Barranco Seco.  Its at the end of the clip.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiwlm-FAZNI

This species is officially categorised as critically endangered. They are a cross between a shark and a stingray.  Their breading cycle is slow and over the years they have been over fished. In fact, the population of Angel Sharks around the Canary Islands is one of the last remaining populations of these amazing creatures.

They pose very little risk to divers, although they have been known to bite when provoked. The females can grow up to a length of 2.4 metres, and males can reach 1.8 metres. The maximum recorded weight is 80 kg.

A common misconception of sharks is that they need to remain swimming in order to breathe, but this is only true of certain species. The Angle shark is among many species which are able to settle on the bottom and pump fresh water past their gills for oxygen.

They are a nocturnal ambush predator and they are often seen agitating the bottom in order to partially bury themselves in sand while waiting for passing prey, usually small bottom-dwelling fish. Once these angel sharks are buried it takes a sharp eye of a diver to spot the faint outline, exposed eyes and gently moving gill slits.
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General Discussion / Re: Does anyone recognise this fish?
« Last post by White Rose on December 26, 2019 »
Thank you very much TimO.  That's  put my mind at rest.  Thanks for replying.
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General Discussion / Re: Radio controlled clocks in Tenerife?
« Last post by nophead on December 26, 2019 »
That seems odd because I think the Central European Time signal comes from Germany and is on a different frequency. Some clocks do both but usually with a switch I think.
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General Discussion / Re: Does anyone recognise this fish?
« Last post by TimO on December 26, 2019 »
Hi White Rose, To avoid any confusion that might have arisen in my reply to your enquiry about the species of fish in the photograph you attached to your original enquiry. The fish is definitely known as a Monk Fish. It's also known as an Angel Shark and if you look it up on Google you will see that it is the fish in question. Sea anglers around Britain and Ireland know it as The Monk Fish, but it's also known as the Angel Shark.

The Angler Fish is an ugly looking brute that comes in all shapes and sizes. The most common species caught commercially and on rod and line around Britain and Ireland has got a very flat head that takes up more than half its body and it has a mouthful of very sharp teeth. It's skinned tail is what you normally see displayed on the fishmongers slap as Monk Fish, and it's served up in restaurants as Monk Fish goujons, but as I've stated it's correct name is Angler Fish.
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General Discussion / Re: Does anyone recognise this fish?
« Last post by TimO on December 26, 2019 »
Hi, White Rose,the fish in question is called a Monkfish. It's a member of the Shark family even though it looks very ray like. Now before anyone gets up in arms about this fish being a Monkfish let me just say that it's completely different to what's known as the Monkfish you'd see on a fishmongers slab. The Monkfish you find on a fishmongers slab is actually an Anglerfish, which is a completely different species of fish altogether. The reason it's called an Angler Fish is because on top of its head is a fleshy rod like appendage with a piece of skin attached to it. The Angler Fish uses this 'rod' like appendage to attract fish to within close distance of where it lies on the sea bed camouflaged until it strikes like a flash to engulf its prey whole.

If you don't believe me you can look up both species of fish I mentioned on Google and you'll see that I'm correct. I've been a sea angler for nearly 6 decades and I know most of the species of sea fish found in the Mediterranean and British and Irish waters.
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General Discussion / Re: Does anyone recognise this fish?
« Last post by Davymar on December 26, 2019 »
I don't think it is a Grouper, they are more rounded, possibly an electric ray looking at the flat fins.
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