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Chrissi

Politics
« on: February 17, 2009 »
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  • I am a liar, I am posting one more string. Do any of you wish to debate UK polotics??? How is life in the UK affecting us expats here in Tenerife? Also how is it affecting our families in the UK.  I am talking about the responsible people. Not the ones that use the system to ensure they get lots of benefits to which they are not really entitled to. There are many people on this Island that are claiming benefits unjustly and that money could be helping our families. Also the ones that have returned to the UK are taking benefits they have not earned. This all costs us dearly. Any comments folks.
    « Last Edit: February 17, 2009 by Chrissi »

    Chrissi

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #1 on: February 17, 2009 »
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  • Before anyone starts shouting I do know that Politics is spelt with an I not an O. We all make mistakes, hey ho. The I and the O are side by side on my keyboard so that is how the error occured. However, Grockle bless him has explained how to edit any post and see it with a white background and not blue, which I find difficult to see against the blue. Thanks Mate.
    « Last Edit: February 17, 2009 by Chrissi »

    amunette

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #2 on: February 17, 2009 »
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  • Quote
    How is life in the UK affecting us expats here in Tenerife? Also how is it affecting our families in the UK.  I am talking about the responsible people. Not the ones that use the system to ensure they get lots of benefits to which they are not really entitled to. There are many people on this Island that are claiming benefits unjustly and that money could be helping our families. Also the ones that have returned to the UK are taking benefits they have not earned. This all costs us dearly. Any comments folks.

    OK. I don't think many in the UK really care how it's affecting the expats. I know that sounds harsh, but it's true. You/they cannot start whinging now as for many years expats have been living a good old life due to the strong pound. I'll bet the expats were not worrying about those in the UK then, more like sitting back saying "ahh, this is the life"!!! It is the risk you take when you move abroad.

    Most people here are feeling the pinch, especially on the fuel bills, but most seem to be muddling through as best they can.

    As for benefits, I agree, those who use them wrongly drain money from those who are claiming honestly. If you know of people claiming illegally, you should pass their info on to the relevant authorities in the UK. It is anonymous, and I think you can do it online. I am not sure what they could be claiming though, as JSA(job seekers) requires you to sign on every two weeks, IS(income support) has regular checks and job centre reviews where you physically have to go to the office. Child benefit can be legally claimed for 3 months after you leave the UK.

     Most who return to the UK and claim are usually just trying to get back on their feet whilst job hunting, and may have paid into the UK tax system for years without claiming a penny so feel they are entitled to short-term help, though they have been abroad.
     
    « Last Edit: February 17, 2009 by amunette »

    Chrissi

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #3 on: February 17, 2009 »
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  • Yes I agree most of us expats came here to have a better way of life, more chilled out and for the wonderful weather which helps with health problems. Also yes we did benefit when the pound was strong and for those of us unable to work and with only a sterling income it was great. Now it is a very different story. I am pleased to hear that the people in your area of the UK are managing OK but from the news and from what people living there tell me it is very grim. One of my sons lives on the other side of the world but is recently visiting UK and he said he was so shocked at how bad things were. So many people out of work, shops all closed down etc etc. It all really worries me for the sake of my grandchildrens future.
    A lot of it sounds very similar to here though with very few jobs,bars/restaurants/shops all closing mainly due to lack of UK tourists which is due to the pound and prices here rising all the time. So perhaps it is true to say it is a world wide problem and has had that knock on effect.
    Maybe UK should have gone with the EURO ???? Maybe if Gordon Brown hadnt sold the Gold reserves ?????
    I hope in my lifetime I see a complete reversal and that the people in the UK can prosper again. Anyone got any bright ideas??
    Who for Prime Minister and Why???
    Bet we might get some real fun answers to that question but serious ones would be nice too.
    « Last Edit: February 17, 2009 by Chrissi »

    amunette

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #4 on: February 19, 2009 »
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    I am pleased to hear that the people in your area of the UK are managing OK but from the news and from what people living there tell me it is very grim. One of my sons lives on the other side of the world but is recently visiting UK and he said he was so shocked at how bad things were. So many people out of work, shops all closed down etc etc. It all really worries me for the sake of my grandchildrens future.

    I think the wages around here are so poor, and always have been, that it's not much different for us now!! I think it's worse in areas where they have higher wages etc, as people live to those standards and find it hard to adjust to a drop in income when jobs are lost. I don't get the feeling its that grim though, as I am a member of a few parenting sites where people from all over the UK meet for a chat/gossip/debate/support, and the general vibe is that yes, belts are being tightened, economies made etc, but most seem to be pretty positive.

    Quote
    A lot of it sounds very similar to here though with very few jobs,bars/restaurants/shops all closing mainly due to lack of UK tourists which is due to the pound and prices here rising all the time. So perhaps it is true to say it is a world wide problem and has had that knock on effect.

    Exactly, it is a global recession, not just a UK one, and Spain has been hit hard, not just in the tourist areas, but the Spanish jobs market in general. On the Spanish news the other week they were saying for every 1 job lost in other EU countries, 10 are lost in the Spanish workforce.

    (got to go out now, will address other points later!!)

    orange

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #5 on: February 19, 2009 »
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  • Spain is still a very young democracy and the demographics are entirely different to the UK.

    As this is a political thread, the UK spin machine would like you to think it is a global recession.
     
    But in reality it is one purely, for the UK, one of loose regulation of the UK Banking System.
    The ability of Countries to march in and take over any businesses it wishes. Iceland is a great
    example, purchasing large amounts of the UK High Street (including Iceland) with money
     invested (overseas) by UK Councils, Charities etc.
     
    For global read Gordon...

    amunette

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #6 on: February 19, 2009 »
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  • Orange, I can assure you it has hit mainland Spain really hard. Prices were going up on food etc way before they did in the UK. The jobs situation is really, really bad. My partner is Canarian, he watches Spanish news daily, and it is truely grim at the moment, especially on the mainland.

    This recession has been cause by the USA , because of mortgage issues etc. It IS global, that is not political spin, it is fact.

    orange

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #7 on: February 19, 2009 »
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  • The recession in Spain started prior to the collapse or rather disclosure of
    the sub-prime lending scandal, bonus swilling banking system in the US with
    UK investment etc.

    I would put the start for Spain, that was on poor foundation and having
    just exited the EEU poverty funding net, as the oversupply of property.

    The bubble was burst and recession swung in, the old chestnut of public
    spending on new projects also failed, sending Spain into further
    recession.

    This last idea was one of Gordon's first for the UK. That has not even
    materialised yet and may not as public money is throw at the bankers
    by the bucket load...

    wags

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #8 on: February 19, 2009 »
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  • If everyone hasn?t grasped the point after 180 odd post?s amunette has a canarian partner

    I THINK WE GOT THE MESSAGE NOW   ??? >:( >:(

    amunette

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #9 on: February 19, 2009 »
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  • Wags, not everyone who visits this site is a regular. We have people joining all the time. Also, in light of people sarcastic "you don't even live here" comments aimed at us who live in the UK, I think it important to point out that as a Canarian, my OH knows a little more about Spain than the expats!!!

    Why did you join the thread? Just to be personal or do you actually have a point of view/opinion on the topic being discussed?

    Chrissi

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #10 on: April 22, 2009 »
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  • I was disappointed that nobody came up with suggestions for a New Prime Minister in the UK. We could all have had a good laugh. On a more serious note. What do the expats in Tenerife think about todays budget. I thought a bit shocking and very informative about the actual state of the UK's finances. Is it the end of New Labour(are they New Labour)? What do you think the outcome will be politically, Conservatives in command, Lib dems in Command, when we will get another General election????

    orange

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #11 on: April 27, 2009 »
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  • Hopefully this is the end of Nu Labour. Like a leopard they never change their
    spots. Running the Country into the buffers and emptying the coffers and
    creating out of control debt.

    Always ready to blame everyone and everybody for their demise. Never able to take
    responsibility for the most basic of matters.
     
    Brown must go together with his select band of skilled expense claimants, always
    ready to bend the rules to fill their own pockets. The do nothing option personified.

    Offline el presidente

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    Re: Politics
    « Reply #12 on: April 27, 2009 »
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  • I think Darling Darling is taking his financial advice from Robert Mugabe.

    POOKYBLUE

    Re: Politics
    « Reply #13 on: May 09, 2009 »
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  • Whoever becomes prime minister, they will be the same as any other prime minister, CRAP!