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borris

Credit card scam
« on: November 30, 2007 »
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  • From time to time you get an email which makes you think with the "lost of personal records in the uk" etc.
    This is quite a plausible scam this seems to only be in the USA side at present but watch out.


    This one is pretty slick since they provide Y O U with all the information, except the one piece they want.
    Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it. This information is worth reading. By understanding how the VISA & MasterCard Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.

    One of our employees was called on Wednesday from "VISA", and I was called on Thursday from "MasterCard".

    The scam works like this: Person calling says, "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank) did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for 'a3497.99 from a Marketing company based inLondon?" When you say "No", the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from 'a3297 to 'a3497, just under the 'a3500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?"

    You say "yes". The caller continues - "I will be starting a fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 0800 number listed on the back of your card (0800-VISA) and ask for Security.

    You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. "Do you need me to read it again?"

    Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works the caller then says, "I need to verify you are in possession of your card." He'll ask you to "turn your card over and look for some numbers." There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?" After you say, "No," the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back if you do", and hangs up.

    You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of 'a3497.99 was charged to our card.

    Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Mastercard directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

    What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a "Jason Richardson of MasterCard" with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this scam is happening .

    Falstaff

    Re: Credit card scam
    « Reply #1 on: November 30, 2007 »
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  • Thanks for the warning Borris, forewarned is forearmed.

    Where would the scammers have got your card details from?  More than likely from a local retail outlet you have used which has illegally scanned one side of your card when you paid for a transaction. It would then be easy enough to find you in the local  telephone directory. Have you and your colleague recently used your cards at the same retail outlet?

    They could possibly have picked up your details through spyware which has been hidden on your computer. Whenever I do any internet banking or transactions I do several security scans and very occasionally I pick up the odd Trojan or Key Logger (worryingly, not always by the same programs, so its advisable to run several). It amazes me that friends buy things on the internet  but never think to scan their PCs.  Some have no security programs at all (even though some of the best ones are absolutely free

    http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/the_web/article2361464.ece

    Offline maps

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    Re: Credit card scam
    « Reply #2 on: November 30, 2007 »
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  • Very interesting posts  thank you both
    « Last Edit: November 30, 2007 by maps »
    EVERYDAY WHEN I WAKE UP, I THANK THE LORD I'M WELSH

    sebastian

    Re: Credit card scam
    « Reply #3 on: November 30, 2007 »
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  • Does this mean CASH IS KING ??

    Offline janey

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    Re: Credit card scam
    « Reply #4 on: November 30, 2007 »
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  • Does this mean CASH IS KING ??

    trust you to pop up when there is a credit card scam going on..... ;)

    Falstaff

    Re: Credit card scam
    « Reply #5 on: November 30, 2007 »
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  • You are absolutely right Seb. You canquote t beat it. The old ways are the best.

    Mrs Falstaff always keeps a stash under the bed. There is nothing like the feel and smell of a fat wad of cash.  You certainly donquote t get the same satisfaction from holding a bank statement. And who needs anti virus protection when youquote ve got a 12 bore!
    Iquote d like to see someone try to scam her.

    Did you know that the majority of the European Unionquote s  500 Euro notes are ldblquote circulatingdblquote  under Spanish  beds?  Spanish people must be paranoid about credit card scams too - that would explain it.