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Author Topic: Cave of the 1000 Mummies  (Read 2992 times)

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Offline dablar

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Cave of the 1000 Mummies
« on: November 15, 2011 »
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  • In the edition of Tenerife News 29 April to 12 May ( 424 ), there is an article about a book called " Cave of the 1000 Mummies ", about trying to trace a long lost  Guanche burial cave. Is there anyone out there with any idea where i can get an English Language version of this book, tried Amazon and not surprisingly no luck.

    Offline Edward Bear

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    Re: Cave of the 1000 Mummies
    « Reply #1 on: November 15, 2011 »
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  • Dablar, found this on a root through "tinternet"

    Not content to ransack Egyptian tombs for mummies, merchants turned to sources like the Canary Islands, off the northwest coast of Africa. The Guanche people once practiced mummymaking on these islands. After Spain invaded the Canary Islands in 1402, thousands of mummies were found in caves scattered across Tenerife, the largest island. It appeared that most of them had belonged to the Guanche aristocracy.

    In 1526, a man named Thomas Nichols explored a cave containing approximately four hundred mummies. Many of the mummies were lying in the extended position, but some were standing straight up and others were hanging from the walls. In 1770, a cave containing 1,000 mummies was located between the towns of Arico and Guimar. And in 1773, a smaller mummy cave was found by a Captain Young who commanded the sloop Weasel. In this cave, the mummies were sewn up in goatskins. Young asked the local priest if he could buy one of the bodies. At first, the priest objected, but when Young offered him some gold, the priest allowed him to buy one. Young took the mummy back to England and pre?sented it to Trinity College, Cambridge.

    In all, five caves on Tenerife holding mummies were found, though some accounts reveal that at least twenty caves existed. Despite the number of mummies that were discovered on Tenerife, almost none are in existence today because most were turned into powder and sold as medicine. Those placed on display in museums have been removed from exhibit recently; therefore, it is no longer possible to see a Guanche mummy except in a photograph or illustration.

    Offline Falstaff

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    Re: Cave of the 1000 Mummies
    « Reply #2 on: November 15, 2011 »
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  • All you ever wanted to know about dead Guanches, and more, can be found here (with the help of Google Language Tools).

    http://translate.google.co.uk/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.palimpalem.com%2F1%2FMELODAIT%2Findex.html%3Fbody23.html&sl=es&tl=en&hl=&ie=UTF-8

    Scroll down to Guanches Mummies.
    « Last Edit: November 15, 2011 by Falstaff »

    Offline dablar

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    Re: Cave of the 1000 Mummies
    « Reply #3 on: November 16, 2011 »
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  • Thanks, that'll help me find something interesting to read when out there on my sun bed in the new year.
    A good few years ago had a fascinating tour of the museum in Santa Cruz. Got chatting to one of the curators there, and when she discovered I was in a similar line of business I got a conducted tour including seeing some of the artefacts not on general display to the public. Very interesting, and surprisingly little known about the history of the inhabitants prior to the Spanish conquest. Islands full of legends including the legend of San Baradon, the island that appears and disappears.